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Engaging With Barth: Contemporary Evangelical Critiques

Gibson, David; Strange, Daniel

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http://www.engagingwithbarth.com/

This volume aims to engage with Karl Barth's questions and answers on a range of topics vital to Christian theology. Specifically, whether by going beyond, behind or against Barth, the chapters presented here attempt to provide a contemporary orientation to certain aspects of Barth's theology that can be deemed problematic from the standpoint of historic, confessional evangelicalism. Why engage with Barth? And why the particular approach of this book?

The answer to the first question is that Barth's significance as arguably the greatest theologian of the twentieth century - increasingly being recognized in an ongoing renaissance of international Barth scholarship - means that Barth provides both opportunity and challenge for evangelicalism.

There is renewed interest in the question of how evangelicals should or should not appropriate Barth. Given the sheer diversity within worldwide evangelicalism, a consensus is unlikely to be reached. Be that as it may, in a range of areas, evangelical theology stands to gain from careful and critical listening to what Barth has to say.

408 Pages
Published March 2009

About the Editors:

David Gibson is Associate Minister at High Church, Hilton, Aberdeen. He studied theology at Nottingham University and King's College London, and has worked as a Staff Worker for the Religious and Theological Studies Fellowship, part of Universities and Colleges Christian Fellowship.

Daniel Strange is Lecturer in Culture, Religion and Public Theology at Oak Hill Theological College, London. Previously, he was Co-ordinator of the Religious and Theological Studies Fellowship.

Contributors:

Henri Blocher is Gunter H. Knoedler Professor of Systematic Theology, Wheaton College Graduate School of Biblical and Theological Studies, Illinois, and is doyen honoraire at the Faculte Libre de Theologie evangelique in Vaux-sur-Seine, where he was formerly Professor of Systematic Theology. He is President of the Fellowship of European Evangelical Theologians. His books include In the Beginning (IVP, 1984), Evil and the Cross (Apollos, 1994) and Original Sin: Illuminating the Riddle (Apollos, 2004).

Oliver D. Crisp is Reader in Theology, University of Bristol, England. Previously, he taught at the University of St. Andrews (2002-2004) and was the Frederick J. Crosson Research Fellow at the Center for Philosophy of Religion, University of Notre Dame, USA (2004-2005). He is the author of Jonathan Edwards and the Metaphysics of Sin (Ashgate, 2005), Divinity and Humanity: The Incarnation Reconsidered (Cambridge, 2007) and An American Augustinian: Sin and Salvation in the Dogmatic Theology of William G. T. Shedd (Paternoster, 2007). He also co-edited Jonathan Edwards: Philosophical Theologian (Ashgate, 2003) with Paul Helm.

David Gibson studied theology at Nottingham University and King's College London, and completed a doctorate at Aberdeen University in historical theology. He has worked as a Staff Worker for the Religious and Theological Studies Fellowship, part of UCCF, and is currently Assistant Minister at High Church, Hilton, Aberdeen. His publications include Reading the Decree: Exegesis, Election and Christology in Calvin and Barth (London/New York: T&T; Clark, forthcoming 2009).

Ryan Glomsrud is a DPhil candidate at the University of Oxford (Pembroke College). He holds a BA from Wheaton College, Illinois, and an MA from Westminster Seminary California. His research interests include modern European religious history, especially nineteenth-century intellectual and cultural history and the history of the sixteenth-century Protestant Reformation. His dissertation explores Karl Barth's relationship to the confessional Reformed tradition. He is a visiting doctoral student (Graduate in Residence) at Harvard Divinity School (2007-2009).

Paul Helm was Professor of the History and Philosophy of Religion, King's College London, 1993-2000, and previously a Reader in Philosophy at the University of Liverpool. He held the J. I. Packer Chair of Philosophical Theology at Regent College, Vancouver, 2001-5, where he is a Teaching Fellow. His books include Eternal God (Clarendon, 1988), The Providence of God (IVP, 1993) and John Calvin's Ideas (Oxford University Press, 2004).

Michael S. Horton is J. Gresham Machen Professor of Systematic Theology at Westminster Seminary California, and editor of Modern Reformation magazine. To date three volumes of his four-part project have appeared: Covenant and Eschatology: The Divine Drama (Westminster John Knox, 2002), Lord and Servant: A Covenant Christology (Westminster John Knox, 2005) and Covenant and Salvation: Union with Christ (Westminster John Knox, 2007). He has also authored God of Promise: Introducing Covenant Theology (Baker, 2006).

A. T. B. McGowan is Principal of the Highland Theological College, Dingwall, Scotland. He holds an Honorary Professorship in Reformed Doctrine at the University of Aberdeen, is an Adjunct Professor of Theology at Reformed Theological Seminary and a Visiting Professor of Theology at Westminster Theological Seminary, Philadelphia. His most recent publications are (ed.), Always Reforming: Explorations in Systematic Theology (Apollos, 2006); 'Justification and the Ordo Salutis', in Bruce L. McCormack (ed.), Justification in Perspective: Historical Developments and Contemporary Challenges (Baker, 2006), and The Divine Spiration of Scripture (Apollos, 2007).

Donald Macleod has been Professor of Systematic Theology at the Free Church of Scotland College, Edinburgh, since 1978, and Principal since 1999. Prior to his appointment to the college he served in two pastoral charges, first, in Kilmallie (Inverness-shire) and then in Partick (Glasgow). His books include The Person of Christ (IVP, 1998) and Jesus Is Lord: Christology Yesterday and Today (Mentor, 2001).

Michael J. Ovey is Principal of Oak Hill Theological College, London, where he also teaches doctrine and apologetics. He read law at Oxford and worked as a lawyer drafting Government legislation. Theological study at Cambridge was followed by serving as a curate at All Saints Crowborough, and a doctoral thesis in patristic trinitarian theology from King's College London. He has also taught at Moore Theological College, Sydney, where he completed an MTh on John's Gospel. He is the co-author of Pierced for our Transgressions (IVP, 2007).

Sebastian Rehnman (B.A., M.Phil., Gothenburg University; D.Phil., University of Oxford) is Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of Stavanger, Adjunct Professor of Philosophy of Religion at the School of Missions and Theology, Stavanger, and Docent of Philosophy of Religion at Uppsala University.. He has been visiting scholar to University of Oxford and Yale University. His publications include: Divine Discourse: The Theological Methodology of John Owen (Baker Academic, 2002)..

Daniel Strange is Lecturer in Culture, Religion and Public Theology at Oak Hill Theological College, London. Previously, he was Co-ordinator of the Religious and Theological Studies Fellowship. His doctoral dissertation, undertaken at the University of Bristol and entitled The Possibility of Salvation among the Unevangelised: An Analysis of Inclusivism in Recent Evangelical Theology, was published by Paternoster in 2002. He has published a number of other articles and chapters in the area of the theology of religions and systematic theology.

Mark D. Thompson is Academic Dean and Head of Theology at Moore Theological College, Sydney. His doctoral research was at the University of Oxford, where he studied the doctrine of Scripture in the theology of Martin Luther. He is the author of numerous articles and A Sure Ground on Which to Stand (Paternoster, 2004), A Clear and Present Word: The Clarity of Scripture (Apollos, 2006), Too Big for Words? The Transcendent God and Finite Human Language (Latimer House, 2006). He was joint editor of The Gospel to the Nations (Apollos, 2000).

Garry J. Williams is Academic Dean of Oak Hill Theological College, London, where he teaches church history and doctrine. He read theology at Oxford where he later completed a doctorate on Hugo Grotius - understanding of the atonement. Since 2006 he has been Visiting Professor of Historical Theology at Westminster Theological Seminary, Philadelphia. He has published on subjects including the history of evangelicalism and the atonement, and is writing a biblical, historical and systematic exposition of penal substitutionary atonement.

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