The Loveliness of Christ (Soft Gift Edition) Rutherford, Samuel cover image
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Product Details
  • Cover Type:
  • 128 Pages
  • Publisher: Banner of Truth
  • Publication Date: June 2007
  • ISBN: FRUTHESALOVELINESSOFCHRIST9780851519562

The Loveliness of Christ (Soft Gift Edition)

Rutherford, Samuel

Pricing details

$14.00

The Loveliness of Christ is a beautiful little gift book containing short extracts in which some of Rutherford’s most helpful thoughts are allowed to stand out in their unadorned wisdom and power. Those familiar with Andrew Bonar’s great nineteenth-century collection of the Letters of Samuel Rutherford will feel that this setting of brief quotations makes Rutherford’s words sparkle like diamonds on a dark cloth in a jeweller’s shop. It is not surprising then, that a hundred years ago, H. C. G. Moule, the Anglican Bishop of Durham, said in his simple but elegant commendation of the original edition of The Loveliness of Christ that it was ‘a small casket stored with many jewels’. It is the publisher’s wish that the reader, in meditating on these pages, will find here help, comfort, wise counsel, and spiritual compass, and to say with Rutherford, ‘Every day we may see some new thing in Christ. His love hath neither brim nor bottom.’

About the Author

Samuel Rutherford (1600–61) was born in the village of Nisbet, Roxburghshire, and educated at Jedburgh Grammar School and Edinburgh University (MA, 1621). From 1623 he acted as Regent of Humanity at the University, with responsibilities as a Latin tutor. There is a strong suggestion that 1624 was the date of his conversion, and he began reading theology at Edinburgh under Andrew Ramsay.

In 1627 he was settled as minister of Anwoth in Kirkcudbrightshire, and so began a ministry lasting only nine years, yet one ‘whose fragrance and power has left the name of Anwoth forever stamped on the hearts of Christian people’. In July 1636 the High Commission brought his ministry in Anwoth to an end because of his nonconformity, barring him from preaching in Scotland and exiling him to Aberdeen for the duration of the King’s pleasure. It was during his two years in Aberdeen that many of his much-loved Letters were written.

After the Covenanters’ revolution in 1638 Rutherford returned to Anwoth and was a commissioner to the Glasgow Assembly. The commission of that Assembly designated him Professor of Divinity at St Mary’s College, St Andrews. He consented to the office with the stipulation that he be permitted to preach regularly, and was made a colleague of Robert Blair in the city pulpit.

In 1643 Rutherford left for London as one of the Scottish Commissioners to the Westminster Assembly. He remained in the city four years, preached before the Long Parliament, took a prominent part in the Assembly’s debates on theology and Church polity, and published five major books. In his Lex, Rex (1644) Rutherford denied that a limitless sovereignty belonged to the King, and contended that the Crown is bestowed by the voluntary consent of the people, who are at liberty to resist a tyrant. In 1647 he resumed his duties at St Andrews and was soon made Principal of St Mary’s. In 1651 he became Rector of the University.

At the Restoration of Charles II in 1661 the Committee of Estates ordered the burning of Lex, Rex, deprived Rutherford of his offices, and cited him to come before Parliament to answer a charge of treason. Rutherford was already terminally ill and replied, ‘I have got summons already before a Superior Judge and Judicatory, and I behove to answer to my first summons, and ere your day come, I will be where few kings and great folks come.’ Death indeed intervened before the charge could be tried.

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The Loveliness of Christ is a beautiful little gift book containing short extracts in which some of Rutherford’s most helpful thoughts are allowed to stand out in their unadorned wisdom and power. Those familiar with Andrew Bonar’s great nineteenth-century collection of the Letters of Samuel Rutherford will feel that this setting of brief quotations makes Rutherford’s words sparkle like diamonds on a dark cloth in a jeweller’s shop. It is not surprising then, that a hundred years ago, H. C. G. Moule, the Anglican Bishop of Durham, said in his simple but elegant commendation of the original edition of The Loveliness of Christ that it was ‘a small casket stored with many jewels’. It is the publisher’s wish that the reader, in meditating on these pages, will find here help, comfort, wise counsel, and spiritual compass, and to say with Rutherford, ‘Every day we may see some new thing in Christ. His love hath neither brim nor bottom.’

About the Author

Samuel Rutherford (1600–61) was born in the village of Nisbet, Roxburghshire, and educated at Jedburgh Grammar School and Edinburgh University (MA, 1621). From 1623 he acted as Regent of Humanity at the University, with responsibilities as a Latin tutor. There is a strong suggestion that 1624 was the date of his conversion, and he began reading theology at Edinburgh under Andrew Ramsay.

In 1627 he was settled as minister of Anwoth in Kirkcudbrightshire, and so began a ministry lasting only nine years, yet one ‘whose fragrance and power has left the name of Anwoth forever stamped on the hearts of Christian people’. In July 1636 the High Commission brought his ministry in Anwoth to an end because of his nonconformity, barring him from preaching in Scotland and exiling him to Aberdeen for the duration of the King’s pleasure. It was during his two years in Aberdeen that many of his much-loved Letters were written.

After the Covenanters’ revolution in 1638 Rutherford returned to Anwoth and was a commissioner to the Glasgow Assembly. The commission of that Assembly designated him Professor of Divinity at St Mary’s College, St Andrews. He consented to the office with the stipulation that he be permitted to preach regularly, and was made a colleague of Robert Blair in the city pulpit.

In 1643 Rutherford left for London as one of the Scottish Commissioners to the Westminster Assembly. He remained in the city four years, preached before the Long Parliament, took a prominent part in the Assembly’s debates on theology and Church polity, and published five major books. In his Lex, Rex (1644) Rutherford denied that a limitless sovereignty belonged to the King, and contended that the Crown is bestowed by the voluntary consent of the people, who are at liberty to resist a tyrant. In 1647 he resumed his duties at St Andrews and was soon made Principal of St Mary’s. In 1651 he became Rector of the University.

At the Restoration of Charles II in 1661 the Committee of Estates ordered the burning of Lex, Rex, deprived Rutherford of his offices, and cited him to come before Parliament to answer a charge of treason. Rutherford was already terminally ill and replied, ‘I have got summons already before a Superior Judge and Judicatory, and I behove to answer to my first summons, and ere your day come, I will be where few kings and great folks come.’ Death indeed intervened before the charge could be tried.

  • Cover Type:
  • 128 Pages
  • Publisher: Banner of Truth
  • Publication Date: June 2007
  • ISBN: FRUTHESALOVELINESSOFCHRIST9780851519562