The Silmarillion

Tolkien, J.R.R; Tolkien, Christopher (editor)

Endorsements ()

Product Description

Recommended by Professor Vern and Diane Poythress
Westminster Theological Seminary.
Browse all of our faculty recommendations.


The tales of The Silmarillion were the underlying inspiration and source of J.R.R. Tolkien's imaginative writing; he worked on the book throughout his life but never brought it to a final form. Long preceding in its origins The Lord of the Rings, it is the story of the First Age of Tolkien's world, the ancient drama to which characters in The Lord of the Rings look back and in which some of them, such as Elrond and Galadriel, took part.

The title Silmarillion is shortened from Quenta Silmarillion, "The History of the Silmarils," the three great jewels created by Feanor, most gifted of the Elves, in which he imprisoned the light of the Two Trees that illumined Valinor, the land of the gods. When Morgoth, the first Dark Lord, destroyed the Trees, that light lived on only in the Silmarils; Morgoth seized them and set them in his crown, guarded in the impenetrable fortress of Angband in the north of Middle-earth. The Silmarillion is the history of the rebellion of Fëanor and his people against the gods, their exile in Middle-earth, and their war, hopeless despite all the heroisim of Elves and Men, against the great Enemy.

The book includes several other, shorter works beside The Silmarillion proper. Preceding it are "Ainulindalë," the myth of Creation, and "Valaquenta," in which the nature and powers of each of the gods is set forth. After The Silmarillion is "Akallabeth," the story of the downfall of the great island kingdom of Numenor at the end of the Second Age; completing the volume is "Of the Rings of Power and the Third Age," in which the events of The Lord of the Rings are treated in the manner of The Silmarillion.

This new edition of The Silmarillion contains the revised and corrected "second edition" text and, by way of introduction, a letter written by J.R.R. Tolkien in 1951, which provides a brilliant exposition of his conception of the earlier Ages. It also contains almost fifty full-color illustrations by the artist Ted Nasmith, many of which appear for the first time.

386 Pages
Published November 2004

About the Author

J. R. R. Tolkien (1892-1973), beloved throughout the world as the creator of The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings, was a professor of Anglo-Saxon at Oxford, a fellow of Pembroke College, and a fellow of Merton College until his retirement in 1959. His chief interest was the linguistic aspects of the early English written tradition, but even as he studied these classics he was creating a set of his own.

About the Illustrator

Ted Nasmith was introduced to J. R. R. Tolkien's works as a teenager and has been illustrating Middle-earth ever since. Now, in addition to his career as an architectural renderer, he has established himself as a renowned Tolkien interpreter. He has illustrated several Tolkien calendars and Robert Foster's Complete Guide to Middle-earth but is perhaps best known for his work on The Silmarillion. In his approach to Tolkien, Nasmith blends a nineteenth-century romanticism with a twentieth-century dynamism in order to faithfully depict Tolkien's world.

Endorsements for The Silmarillion

Recently Viewed