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"In writing this Guidebook," Bavinck says in his preface, "I had in mind, the pupils in the highest classes of our Christian gymnasium, public schools, in the education of teachers, and in normal schools, etc. and moreover those who desire to understand the main content of our Christian, Reformed confession of faith through a not too comprehensive or expensive book."  Herman Bavinck completed Guidebook for Instruction in the Christian Religion in 1913 and reprinted it in the Netherlands in 1931. He originally intended it for high school students and Christians of every confession. Bavinck's goal was to make Christians more familiar with the rich, deep thoughts of Scripture as universally expressed in the Christian faith.  Guidebook for Instruction in the Christian Religion is an introductory systematic theology by one of the foremost theologians of the past century. Alongside The Sacrifice of Praise, this is Bavinck at his best doing catechetical theology. To this end, Bavinck sets off to explain in a simplified manner the main contents of the Christian religion, even giving it a title that is a tip of the hat to John Calvin's Institute of the Christian Religion. While Bavinck's lengthy Reformed Dogmatics is an academic work, Guidebook for Instruction serves a more egalitarian aim. It is a theological guide for the everyday person in the pew. In this one--and much shorter--volume, Bavinck walks Christian readers through all the major topics covered in Reformed Dogmatics with theological depth and insight.
"In writing this Guidebook," Bavinck says in his preface, "I had in mind, the pupils in the highest classes of our Christian gymnasium, public schools, in the education of teachers, and in normal schools, etc. and moreover those who desire to understand the main content of our Christian, Reformed confession of faith through a not too comprehensive or expensive book."  Herman Bavinck completed Guidebook for Instruction in the Christian Religion in 1913 and reprinted it in the Netherlands in 1931. He originally intended it for high school students and Christians of every confession. Bavinck's goal was to make Christians more familiar with the rich, deep thoughts of Scripture as universally expressed in the Christian faith.  Guidebook for Instruction in the Christian Religion is an introductory systematic theology by one of the foremost theologians of the past century. Alongside The Sacrifice of Praise, this is Bavinck at his best doing catechetical theology. To this end, Bavinck sets off to explain in a simplified manner the main contents of the Christian religion, even giving it a title that is a tip of the hat to John Calvin's Institute of the Christian Religion. While Bavinck's lengthy Reformed Dogmatics is an academic work, Guidebook for Instruction serves a more egalitarian aim. It is a theological guide for the everyday person in the pew. In this one--and much shorter--volume, Bavinck walks Christian readers through all the major topics covered in Reformed Dogmatics with theological depth and insight.
"In writing this Guidebook," Bavinck says in his preface, "I had in mind, the pupils in the highest classes of our Christian gymnasium, public schools, in the education of teachers, and in normal schools, etc. and moreover those who desire to understand the main content of our Christian, Reformed confession of faith through a not too comprehensive or expensive book."  Herman Bavinck completed Guidebook for Instruction in the Christian Religion in 1913 and reprinted it in the Netherlands in 1931. He originally intended it for high school students and Christians of every confession. Bavinck's goal was to make Christians more familiar with the rich, deep thoughts of Scripture as universally expressed in the Christian faith.  Guidebook for Instruction in the Christian Religion is an introductory systematic theology by one of the foremost theologians of the past century. Alongside The Sacrifice of Praise, this is Bavinck at his best doing catechetical theology. To this end, Bavinck sets off to explain in a simplified manner the main contents of the Christian religion, even giving it a title that is a tip of the hat to John Calvin's Institute of the Christian Religion. While Bavinck's lengthy Reformed Dogmatics is an academic work, Guidebook for Instruction serves a more egalitarian aim. It is a theological guide for the everyday person in the pew. In this one--and much shorter--volume, Bavinck walks Christian readers through all the major topics covered in Reformed Dogmatics with theological depth and insight.
"In writing this Guidebook," Bavinck says in his preface, "I had in mind, the pupils in the highest classes of our Christian gymnasium, public schools, in the education of teachers, and in normal schools, etc. and moreover those who desire to understand the main content of our Christian, Reformed confession of faith through a not too comprehensive or expensive book."  Herman Bavinck completed Guidebook for Instruction in the Christian Religion in 1913 and reprinted it in the Netherlands in 1931. He originally intended it for high school students and Christians of every confession. Bavinck's goal was to make Christians more familiar with the rich, deep thoughts of Scripture as universally expressed in the Christian faith.  Guidebook for Instruction in the Christian Religion is an introductory systematic theology by one of the foremost theologians of the past century. Alongside The Sacrifice of Praise, this is Bavinck at his best doing catechetical theology. To this end, Bavinck sets off to explain in a simplified manner the main contents of the Christian religion, even giving it a title that is a tip of the hat to John Calvin's Institute of the Christian Religion. While Bavinck's lengthy Reformed Dogmatics is an academic work, Guidebook for Instruction serves a more egalitarian aim. It is a theological guide for the everyday person in the pew. In this one--and much shorter--volume, Bavinck walks Christian readers through all the major topics covered in Reformed Dogmatics with theological depth and insight.
"In writing this Guidebook," Bavinck says in his preface, "I had in mind, the pupils in the highest classes of our Christian gymnasium, public schools, in the education of teachers, and in normal schools, etc. and moreover those who desire to understand the main content of our Christian, Reformed confession of faith through a not too comprehensive or expensive book."  Herman Bavinck completed Guidebook for Instruction in the Christian Religion in 1913 and reprinted it in the Netherlands in 1931. He originally intended it for high school students and Christians of every confession. Bavinck's goal was to make Christians more familiar with the rich, deep thoughts of Scripture as universally expressed in the Christian faith.  Guidebook for Instruction in the Christian Religion is an introductory systematic theology by one of the foremost theologians of the past century. Alongside The Sacrifice of Praise, this is Bavinck at his best doing catechetical theology. To this end, Bavinck sets off to explain in a simplified manner the main contents of the Christian religion, even giving it a title that is a tip of the hat to John Calvin's Institute of the Christian Religion. While Bavinck's lengthy Reformed Dogmatics is an academic work, Guidebook for Instruction serves a more egalitarian aim. It is a theological guide for the everyday person in the pew. In this one--and much shorter--volume, Bavinck walks Christian readers through all the major topics covered in Reformed Dogmatics with theological depth and insight.
"In writing this Guidebook," Bavinck says in his preface, "I had in mind, the pupils in the highest classes of our Christian gymnasium, public schools, in the education of teachers, and in normal schools, etc. and moreover those who desire to understand the main content of our Christian, Reformed confession of faith through a not too comprehensive or expensive book."  Herman Bavinck completed Guidebook for Instruction in the Christian Religion in 1913 and reprinted it in the Netherlands in 1931. He originally intended it for high school students and Christians of every confession. Bavinck's goal was to make Christians more familiar with the rich, deep thoughts of Scripture as universally expressed in the Christian faith.  Guidebook for Instruction in the Christian Religion is an introductory systematic theology by one of the foremost theologians of the past century. Alongside The Sacrifice of Praise, this is Bavinck at his best doing catechetical theology. To this end, Bavinck sets off to explain in a simplified manner the main contents of the Christian religion, even giving it a title that is a tip of the hat to John Calvin's Institute of the Christian Religion. While Bavinck's lengthy Reformed Dogmatics is an academic work, Guidebook for Instruction serves a more egalitarian aim. It is a theological guide for the everyday person in the pew. In this one--and much shorter--volume, Bavinck walks Christian readers through all the major topics covered in Reformed Dogmatics with theological depth and insight.
"In writing this Guidebook," Bavinck says in his preface, "I had in mind, the pupils in the highest classes of our Christian gymnasium, public schools, in the education of teachers, and in normal schools, etc. and moreover those who desire to understand the main content of our Christian, Reformed confession of faith through a not too comprehensive or expensive book."  Herman Bavinck completed Guidebook for Instruction in the Christian Religion in 1913 and reprinted it in the Netherlands in 1931. He originally intended it for high school students and Christians of every confession. Bavinck's goal was to make Christians more familiar with the rich, deep thoughts of Scripture as universally expressed in the Christian faith.  Guidebook for Instruction in the Christian Religion is an introductory systematic theology by one of the foremost theologians of the past century. Alongside The Sacrifice of Praise, this is Bavinck at his best doing catechetical theology. To this end, Bavinck sets off to explain in a simplified manner the main contents of the Christian religion, even giving it a title that is a tip of the hat to John Calvin's Institute of the Christian Religion. While Bavinck's lengthy Reformed Dogmatics is an academic work, Guidebook for Instruction serves a more egalitarian aim. It is a theological guide for the everyday person in the pew. In this one--and much shorter--volume, Bavinck walks Christian readers through all the major topics covered in Reformed Dogmatics with theological depth and insight.
"In writing this Guidebook," Bavinck says in his preface, "I had in mind, the pupils in the highest classes of our Christian gymnasium, public schools, in the education of teachers, and in normal schools, etc. and moreover those who desire to understand the main content of our Christian, Reformed confession of faith through a not too comprehensive or expensive book."  Herman Bavinck completed Guidebook for Instruction in the Christian Religion in 1913 and reprinted it in the Netherlands in 1931. He originally intended it for high school students and Christians of every confession. Bavinck's goal was to make Christians more familiar with the rich, deep thoughts of Scripture as universally expressed in the Christian faith.  Guidebook for Instruction in the Christian Religion is an introductory systematic theology by one of the foremost theologians of the past century. Alongside The Sacrifice of Praise, this is Bavinck at his best doing catechetical theology. To this end, Bavinck sets off to explain in a simplified manner the main contents of the Christian religion, even giving it a title that is a tip of the hat to John Calvin's Institute of the Christian Religion. While Bavinck's lengthy Reformed Dogmatics is an academic work, Guidebook for Instruction serves a more egalitarian aim. It is a theological guide for the everyday person in the pew. In this one--and much shorter--volume, Bavinck walks Christian readers through all the major topics covered in Reformed Dogmatics with theological depth and insight.
"In writing this Guidebook," Bavinck says in his preface, "I had in mind, the pupils in the highest classes of our Christian gymnasium, public schools, in the education of teachers, and in normal schools, etc. and moreover those who desire to understand the main content of our Christian, Reformed confession of faith through a not too comprehensive or expensive book."  Herman Bavinck completed Guidebook for Instruction in the Christian Religion in 1913 and reprinted it in the Netherlands in 1931. He originally intended it for high school students and Christians of every confession. Bavinck's goal was to make Christians more familiar with the rich, deep thoughts of Scripture as universally expressed in the Christian faith.  Guidebook for Instruction in the Christian Religion is an introductory systematic theology by one of the foremost theologians of the past century. Alongside The Sacrifice of Praise, this is Bavinck at his best doing catechetical theology. To this end, Bavinck sets off to explain in a simplified manner the main contents of the Christian religion, even giving it a title that is a tip of the hat to John Calvin's Institute of the Christian Religion. While Bavinck's lengthy Reformed Dogmatics is an academic work, Guidebook for Instruction serves a more egalitarian aim. It is a theological guide for the everyday person in the pew. In this one--and much shorter--volume, Bavinck walks Christian readers through all the major topics covered in Reformed Dogmatics with theological depth and insight.
"In writing this Guidebook," Bavinck says in his preface, "I had in mind, the pupils in the highest classes of our Christian gymnasium, public schools, in the education of teachers, and in normal schools, etc. and moreover those who desire to understand the main content of our Christian, Reformed confession of faith through a not too comprehensive or expensive book."  Herman Bavinck completed Guidebook for Instruction in the Christian Religion in 1913 and reprinted it in the Netherlands in 1931. He originally intended it for high school students and Christians of every confession. Bavinck's goal was to make Christians more familiar with the rich, deep thoughts of Scripture as universally expressed in the Christian faith.  Guidebook for Instruction in the Christian Religion is an introductory systematic theology by one of the foremost theologians of the past century. Alongside The Sacrifice of Praise, this is Bavinck at his best doing catechetical theology. To this end, Bavinck sets off to explain in a simplified manner the main contents of the Christian religion, even giving it a title that is a tip of the hat to John Calvin's Institute of the Christian Religion. While Bavinck's lengthy Reformed Dogmatics is an academic work, Guidebook for Instruction serves a more egalitarian aim. It is a theological guide for the everyday person in the pew. In this one--and much shorter--volume, Bavinck walks Christian readers through all the major topics covered in Reformed Dogmatics with theological depth and insight.
"In writing this Guidebook," Bavinck says in his preface, "I had in mind, the pupils in the highest classes of our Christian gymnasium, public schools, in the education of teachers, and in normal schools, etc. and moreover those who desire to understand the main content of our Christian, Reformed confession of faith through a not too comprehensive or expensive book."  Herman Bavinck completed Guidebook for Instruction in the Christian Religion in 1913 and reprinted it in the Netherlands in 1931. He originally intended it for high school students and Christians of every confession. Bavinck's goal was to make Christians more familiar with the rich, deep thoughts of Scripture as universally expressed in the Christian faith.  Guidebook for Instruction in the Christian Religion is an introductory systematic theology by one of the foremost theologians of the past century. Alongside The Sacrifice of Praise, this is Bavinck at his best doing catechetical theology. To this end, Bavinck sets off to explain in a simplified manner the main contents of the Christian religion, even giving it a title that is a tip of the hat to John Calvin's Institute of the Christian Religion. While Bavinck's lengthy Reformed Dogmatics is an academic work, Guidebook for Instruction serves a more egalitarian aim. It is a theological guide for the everyday person in the pew. In this one--and much shorter--volume, Bavinck walks Christian readers through all the major topics covered in Reformed Dogmatics with theological depth and insight.
"In writing this Guidebook," Bavinck says in his preface, "I had in mind, the pupils in the highest classes of our Christian gymnasium, public schools, in the education of teachers, and in normal schools, etc. and moreover those who desire to understand the main content of our Christian, Reformed confession of faith through a not too comprehensive or expensive book."  Herman Bavinck completed Guidebook for Instruction in the Christian Religion in 1913 and reprinted it in the Netherlands in 1931. He originally intended it for high school students and Christians of every confession. Bavinck's goal was to make Christians more familiar with the rich, deep thoughts of Scripture as universally expressed in the Christian faith.  Guidebook for Instruction in the Christian Religion is an introductory systematic theology by one of the foremost theologians of the past century. Alongside The Sacrifice of Praise, this is Bavinck at his best doing catechetical theology. To this end, Bavinck sets off to explain in a simplified manner the main contents of the Christian religion, even giving it a title that is a tip of the hat to John Calvin's Institute of the Christian Religion. While Bavinck's lengthy Reformed Dogmatics is an academic work, Guidebook for Instruction serves a more egalitarian aim. It is a theological guide for the everyday person in the pew. In this one--and much shorter--volume, Bavinck walks Christian readers through all the major topics covered in Reformed Dogmatics with theological depth and insight.
"In writing this Guidebook," Bavinck says in his preface, "I had in mind, the pupils in the highest classes of our Christian gymnasium, public schools, in the education of teachers, and in normal schools, etc. and moreover those who desire to understand the main content of our Christian, Reformed confession of faith through a not too comprehensive or expensive book."  Herman Bavinck completed Guidebook for Instruction in the Christian Religion in 1913 and reprinted it in the Netherlands in 1931. He originally intended it for high school students and Christians of every confession. Bavinck's goal was to make Christians more familiar with the rich, deep thoughts of Scripture as universally expressed in the Christian faith.  Guidebook for Instruction in the Christian Religion is an introductory systematic theology by one of the foremost theologians of the past century. Alongside The Sacrifice of Praise, this is Bavinck at his best doing catechetical theology. To this end, Bavinck sets off to explain in a simplified manner the main contents of the Christian religion, even giving it a title that is a tip of the hat to John Calvin's Institute of the Christian Religion. While Bavinck's lengthy Reformed Dogmatics is an academic work, Guidebook for Instruction serves a more egalitarian aim. It is a theological guide for the everyday person in the pew. In this one--and much shorter--volume, Bavinck walks Christian readers through all the major topics covered in Reformed Dogmatics with theological depth and insight.
Dutch theologian Herman Bavinck (1854-1921) is widely celebrated as one of the top theologians in the Reformed tradition, and through the ongoing labor of translation teams, editors, and publishers, his vast writings are being offered anew to English-only readers.  This book brings the groundbreaking framework of Bavinck's "organic motif" to the fore in one of Bavinck's most influential works. In the best sense of the title, the modern, yet orthodox Bavinck offers readers here both a philosophy of revelation and a philosophy of revelation. Philosophy of Revelation was originally presented by Bavinck at the Stone Lectures at Princeton Theological Seminary in 1908, that by itself deserves being published. This classic text is updated and annotated and may function as a supreme entry into the mind of Bavinck. Bavinck saw theology as the task of "thinking God's thoughts after him and tracing their unity." This project can be seen as "thinking Bavinck's thoughts after him and tracing their unity."
In The Sacrifice of Praise, Herman Bavinck pastorally guides the reader through the importance of the public profession of faith. Bavinck’s careful treatment includes explorations of the unifying power of a common (ecumenical) confession of faith, the blessing of the diversity of believers, and reasonable instruction for those facing persecution for publicly identifying with Christ. Theological, practical, straightforward, and devotional, The Sacrifice of Praise gives readers a fresh appreciation for the importance of confessing one’s faith. This is an updated English translation of the original Dutch edition and includes a new introduction and scriptural citations.
Dutch theologian Herman Bavinck (1854-1921) is widely celebrated as one of the most eloquent divines in the Reformed tradition. And yet there is a curious gap between Bavinck the theologian and the preachers who read him in the present day. How Bavinck preached, or what and how he thought about the act of preaching, are largely unknown. The largest barrier is that his writings on preaching were previously untranslated--until now. Herman Bavinck on Preaching & Preachers is a welcome translation from Dutch of Bavinck's thoughts on preaching and preachers, and includes one of his only written sermons.  For Bavinck, the sermon was the most important part of the worship service, and the preaching of the word is the decisive mark of the church. He believed that the preacher must be a student of the word, search it in all its riches and depth, in its unity and diversity. Translator and editor James Eglinton describes this book as a "useful and very interesting text on how to preach theology" and a "message that sorely needs to be heard if pulpits during our own time are to improve." This is the first time this book is in print. Herman Bavinck on Preaching & Preachers has never been published before in either Dutch or English.
110 years after its original publication, The Wonderful Works of God remains one of the finest single-volume systematic theologies ever written. Adapting the magisterial systematic theology found in his four-volume Reformed Dogmatics, this is perhaps Bavinck’s most eminently practical work – a single, accessible volume for the college classroom and the family bookshelf. Previously published in America as Our Reasonable Faith, this book has had a deep and lasting influence on the growth and development of Reformed theology. It is the publisher’s hope that in its new form, this book continues to astonish readers with the wonderful works of God, and provide a deeper knowledge of their triune God.
"In writing this Guidebook," Bavinck says in his preface, "I had in mind, the pupils in the highest classes of our Christian gymnasium, public schools, in the education of teachers, and in normal schools, etc. and moreover those who desire to understand the main content of our Christian, Reformed confession of faith through a not too comprehensive or expensive book."  Herman Bavinck completed Guidebook for Instruction in the Christian Religion in 1913 and reprinted it in the Netherlands in 1931. He originally intended it for high school students and Christians of every confession. Bavinck's goal was to make Christians more familiar with the rich, deep thoughts of Scripture as universally expressed in the Christian faith.  Guidebook for Instruction in the Christian Religion is an introductory systematic theology by one of the foremost theologians of the past century. Alongside The Sacrifice of Praise, this is Bavinck at his best doing catechetical theology. To this end, Bavinck sets off to explain in a simplified manner the main contents of the Christian religion, even giving it a title that is a tip of the hat to John Calvin's Institute of the Christian Religion. While Bavinck's lengthy Reformed Dogmatics is an academic work, Guidebook for Instruction serves a more egalitarian aim. It is a theological guide for the everyday person in the pew. In this one--and much shorter--volume, Bavinck walks Christian readers through all the major topics covered in Reformed Dogmatics with theological depth and insight.
"In writing this Guidebook," Bavinck says in his preface, "I had in mind, the pupils in the highest classes of our Christian gymnasium, public schools, in the education of teachers, and in normal schools, etc. and moreover those who desire to understand the main content of our Christian, Reformed confession of faith through a not too comprehensive or expensive book."  Herman Bavinck completed Guidebook for Instruction in the Christian Religion in 1913 and reprinted it in the Netherlands in 1931. He originally intended it for high school students and Christians of every confession. Bavinck's goal was to make Christians more familiar with the rich, deep thoughts of Scripture as universally expressed in the Christian faith.  Guidebook for Instruction in the Christian Religion is an introductory systematic theology by one of the foremost theologians of the past century. Alongside The Sacrifice of Praise, this is Bavinck at his best doing catechetical theology. To this end, Bavinck sets off to explain in a simplified manner the main contents of the Christian religion, even giving it a title that is a tip of the hat to John Calvin's Institute of the Christian Religion. While Bavinck's lengthy Reformed Dogmatics is an academic work, Guidebook for Instruction serves a more egalitarian aim. It is a theological guide for the everyday person in the pew. In this one--and much shorter--volume, Bavinck walks Christian readers through all the major topics covered in Reformed Dogmatics with theological depth and insight.

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